posted 28/09/14

Aromatherapy for Vibrant Health & Beauty by Roberta Wilson


Book Description:
Smell is our most ancient and basic sense. So it’s not surprising that aromas can influence us profoundly. This easy-to-use reference is designed specifically for women. It contains a guide to essential oils and an A-Z guide for using aromatherapy to treat specific symptoms. It’s all complemented by tips on basic nutrition and health maintenance.

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posted 20/09/14

Red Hair by Elinor Glyn


Book Description:
This book may have occasional imperfections
such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact,or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections,have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

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posted 16/09/14

How to Write Descriptions of Hair and Skin by Val Kovalin


Book Description:
This is a combined, unabridged volume of my two writing guides (1) How to Write Descriptions of Eyes and Faces, and (2) How to Write Descriptions of Hair and Skin. If you have already bought both guides individually, then you already have the exact same text that is in the combined version contained here.

Those readers who just want one of these two guides can buy it individually. Those who would like both can buy this combined version at a cheaper price than buying them both individually. These guides, combined here or sold individually, are for fiction writers who love physical descriptions of characters.

What do you get? The first part, How to Write Descriptions of Eyes and Faces, covers appearance of the eyes, actions involving the eyes, and how to describe eyelids, eyebrows, and eyelashes. All of this leads into more than 2,000 words explaining 82 different color names to assign to eyes that are black, blue, brown, gray, green, hazel, or violet.

The face section shows how to describe facial shapes, forehead, ears, cheekbones, nose, lips, chin, and facial hair, if any. You learn about facial expressions, such as simpering or sneering, and things like the differences between a frown and a scowl. You also get a section on how the face shows different emotions.

The second part, How to Write Descriptions of Hair and Skin, starts with hair type and hairstyle. It details how the appearance of one’s hair can shape one’s gender identity and ethnic identity. The next sections show how your fictional character’s hair might move, feel, and smell. All this leads to more than 2,000 words explaining 72 different color names to assign to hair that is black, blond, brown, gray, red, or white. There is also a section on highlights and lowlights.

The skin section continues with sections on what your fictional character’s skin might feel like, smell like, and taste like. There is a section on the erotic aspects of skin. Other sections list how your fictional character might modify his or her skin, including tattoos, piercing, and cosmetic surgery. All this leads to more than 2,000 words explaining 43 different color names to assign to skin that is dark, medium tone, or pale.

Who may benefit from this book? Anyone who wants a quick prompt or idea so as not to lose his writing momentum. Readers for whom English is a second language may enjoy the in-depth explanations of American English terms. Authors writing in genres that demand much physical description (for example, fantasy fiction and romance fiction) may also find this book useful.

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